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Disclaimer

Updated: June 8, 2014

This blog is a personal blog written and edited by me. This blog accepts forms of cash advertising, sponsorship, paid insertions or other forms of compensation. When we are compensated for a post, we will make that clear as a sponsored post.

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The owner(s) of this blog is compensated to provide opinion on products, services, websites and various other topics. Even though the owner(s) of this blog receives compensation for our posts or advertisements, we always give our honest opinions, findings, beliefs, or experiences on those topics or products. The views and opinions expressed on this blog are purely the bloggers' own. Any product claim, statistic, quote or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider or party in question.

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BraveCheerfulWorried JoyfulFrightenedCalmExcitedConfusedFrustratedCuriousFriendlyShy IgnoredLonelyInterestedProudEmbarrassedJealousAngryBored Surprised SillyUncomfortableStubbornSafeRelievedPeaceful OverwhelmedLovingCranky

Why it Matters:

We've long thought that naming our feelings could help us manage negative emotional states, but we weren't quite sure how exact…